Annual Conference

Faculty Speakers/Workshops

Plenary Speakers

Dr. Stephen Bavolek

Stephen J. Bavolek, Ph.D., is a recognized leader in the fields of child abuse and neglect treatment and prevention, and parenting education. Born and raised in Chicago, Dr. Bavolek's professional background includes working with emotionally disturbed children and adolescents in schools and residential settings, and abused children and abusive parents in treatment programs. Dr. Bavolek has conducted extensive research in the prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect. He received his doctorate at Utah State University in 1978 and completed a post-doctoral internship at the Kempe Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect in Denver, Colorado. He has held university faculty positions at the University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire, and the University of Utah.

Dr. Bavolek has received numerous international, national, state and local awards for his work, including induction in 1989 into the Royal Guild of the International Social Work Round Table in Vienna, Austria, and selection in 1983 by Phi Delta Kappa as one of 75 young educators in the country who represent the best in educational leadership, research and services. In addition, he has been selected by Oxford's Who's Who in 1993 as a member of the elite registry of extraordinary professionals and in 1998 as a member of the elite registry of extraordinary CEO's. Dr. Bavolek was also Mental Health Professional of the Year of Northern Wisconsin in 1985 and Child Advocate of the Year in Utah in 1991. In 1980, he was recognized by the Military Order of the Purple Heart for outstanding research and services to the handicapped.

Since 1983 he has conducted numerous workshops, has appeared on multiple radio and television talk show programs, and has published numerous books, articles, programs and newsletters. He is the principal author of the Nurturing Parenting Programs, programs designed to prevent and treat child abuse and neglect, and the Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory (AAPI), an inventory designed to assess high risk parenting attitudes. Dr. Bavolek is President of Family Development Resources, Inc. and Executive Director of Family Nurturing Centers International.

Katrina Taylor

Katrina Taylor, 21 years old, was born and raised in Sioux Falls, SD. During her adolescent and teenage years, she was a victim of child abuse and neglect. Katrina's mother abused drugs and alcohol, which led to her running away at the age of 16. The courts placed her in the care of her grandparents, put on the CHINS (Child in Need of Supervision) program, and ordered her to keep a relationship with her mother. When Katrina would visit her mother, they would go to homes where people were dealing drugs which made her feel unsafe and uncomfortable. Due to her mother's choices, their visits were ordered to take place at the Family Visitation Center. With the challenges Katrina has experienced, she has fought diligently through all the obstacles to get to where she is today. She now reigns as Miss Worldwide United and publicly speaks about child abuse and neglect in hopes to help others. Katrina is a student at The University of South Dakota, studying pre-law. She hopes to be an attorney and help children that were in similar situations as her.

Gabrielle Hershey

To the outside world, Gabrielle Hershey appeared to have it all together. Many saw her as a loving mother with a successful career, a woman who had the love and respect of countless friends and family who surrounded her. However, on the inside, she was carrying a significant weight, a burden that many would struggle with understanding and most were not even aware was taking place. After spending years in an abusive relationship, Gabrielle had finally found the strength to leave, fleeing a life lived in fear to protect the lives of herself and her children. However, the turmoil and chaos that she endured afterwards was life changing. Gabrielle quickly came to realize that leaving an abusive relationship was only the start of her journey, a journey filled with uphill battles, continued abuse and constant questioning of every single decision being made. A journey that involved the complex interactions with both the public and private sectors of the supervised access community.

With a strength that only comes from being a survivor, Gabrielle shares her story. She shares the challenges of navigating a system that at times seemed to be working against her and an abusive ex-husband who had an on-going desire to seek control and break her spirit. Hear Gabrielle's story of courage, resilience and determination. Her personal journey of self-reflection and how her identity shifted as she shed the role of 'victim' and proudly assumed the title 'survivor' of domestic violence.

Charlie Applestein

Youth care specialist Charlie Appelstein, M.S.W., President of Appelstein Training Resources, LLC (ATR) provides expert strength-based training, consultation, publications, CDs, and DVDs for individuals and groups who work with children and youth experiencing serious emotional and behavioral issues. Charlie Appelstein

Described as "the best youth care trainer in America" by Robert Lieberman, former president of the American Association of Children's Residential Centers, Charlie has devoted his entire adult career to helping children and youth struggling with emotional and behavioral challenges and those who guide them. An engaging, informative, and humorous speaker, Charlie is the author of three critically acclaimed books on youth care and the creator of two innovative CDs that helps kids and parents make better choices and lead happier lives. Charlie's strength-based approach delivers a message of hope and possibility to our most vulnerable youth and those who shape and influence their lives.

Workshops

DV Immersion Training

REGISTRATION FOR THE IMMERSION TRAINING IS CLOSED. IF YOU ARE AN OVW GRANTEE AND WISH TO ATTEND CONTACT: info@inspireactionforsocialchange.org

A unique option will be available this year at the SVN Conference. SV Providers can elect to attend this hands-on immersive training opportunity to enhance the skills needed to operate a visitation center, while learning how to best serve the women, men, and children who have been affected by battering.

Please NOTE: Attendees of this training will NOT attend SVN breakout sessions, only the SVN Plenary Sessions and meals. Participation is limited to the first 30 attendees who select this option

The goal of the Supervised Visitation Immersion Training is to provide an interactive and intensive training designed to inspire and prepare trainees to become confidently equipped to operate a visitation center which addresses battering, dating violence, child abuse, sexual assault, or stalking.

Get more info Click HERE

When your Nightmare Happens - Dealing with Critical Incidents in Supervised Visitation

In the past decade, there has been an increased reliance by the court upon supervised visitation services in family law cases, particularly those involving domestic violence. While supervised visitation services can provide a measure of safety to victims, practice experiences and research are beginning to emerge. Sharing experiences and lessons learned is key to developing an understanding of the serious realm of supervised visitation. 'When your nightmare happens' is not an examination of specific tragedies, but a general discussion with special emphasis on the critical thinking required and special attention to be considered, particularly pertaining to the impact/exposure to a critical incident.

Valya Roberts is the Executive Director for Supervised Access Centre's in 3 court districts in Ontario Canada. Valya is also the past President of the Supervised Visitation Network. Valya is a former Professor in Human Services at two community colleges (Social Work, Recreation Therapy) and is currently appointed as a Board member for the Mohawk College Ethics Board. She provided consultation and expertise to several organizations including; Ministry of the Attorney General; U.S. Justice Department (VAWO); Safe Havens National Review Committee. Valya is a graduate of Mohawk College (Recreation), University of Waterloo (Social Development Studies) and Nipissing University (Masters of Education) and has also received the Governor General of Canada Gold Medal Award for her academics at Nipissing University.

Accounting for Culture in SV

In supervised visits, there is often a discussion about culture practices versus effective parenting practices. Thus, the question becomes how do practitioners understand and respect different cultural performances while encouraging positive parenting. Cultural competency recognizes that systems, policies, and procedures have an impact on children and families. To create better outcomes for families and children involved in supervised visitation and access, it is vital that as providers we examine our own beliefs and practice while enhancing our knowledge of culture and its impact on parenting. Attendees will gain awareness and the ability to identify culture, and its response in parenting be provided tools to help understand the cultural cues of parents and families in supervised visitations.

Debbie Miles-Senior is a Registered Social Worker, with a BA in Psychology and over 20 years' experience working with families, children and youth. In Ms. Miles-Senior years of experience, she has found parenting to be the biggest challenge and the most rewarding. Her passion is best demonstrated in her ability and commitment to empower and provide support to children, parents and young people. Ms. Miles-Senior's work with parents and children in environments such as the Children's Aid Society, local school board, employment counselling, settlement services and youth serving organizations have all molded her skills in understanding family dynamics and working with families. In the years of Ms. Miles-Seniors' employment, volunteer activities and experience as a parent, a common theme evident in her work is the need to develop security in relationships and support individuals through difficult times.

Introducing iSAID -A Global Solution for Supervised Visitation and Exchange

For over 15 years, Ontario-s Supervised Access Program has been using the Supervised Access Information Database (SAID) to facilitate all aspects of its core business -from the delivery of high quality supervised visits and exchanges, to consistent, secure data collection and reporting, as well as learning and sharing platforms for staff/volunteers. Developed in partnership with Coyote Software Corporation, SAID has been featured at various SVN Conferences for its extensive ability to support the diverse and complex work of supervised visitation and exchange providers, but has been historically restricted for use by the Ontario Program only...until now. Starting in 2018, the Ontario Program will transition to iSAID - a web-based, and significantly upgraded data solution that reflects the evolved business of the Program, as well as leading-edge technology and design.

Unlike the previous system, however, a version of iSAID is available for purchase via Coyote Software Corporation. Designed with the ability to be customized to differences amongst service providers and to grow with innovations in the field, iSAID has the potential to truly be a global solution for supervised visitation and exchange that fulfills the diverse needs of SVN's international membership.

Maribeth Christensen holds an Honours Bachelor of Social Work from Ryerson University, a Masters of Social Work from the University of Toronto (with a specialization in Social Justice and Diversity), and a Masters of Arts in Political Science (with a collaborative program in Women and Gender Studies) from the University of Toronto. Maribeth began her journey with the Ministry of the Attorney General's (MAG) Supervised Access Program (SAP) in 2008 as a placement student and returned to take on the role of Program Analyst in March 2011. In late 2016, Maribeth began acting in the role of Program Manager for SAP, and is now responsible for overseeing funding contracts with non-profit organizations that provide supervised access services on MAG's behalf, as well as working with them to develop standards and training.

Andrew Kirkham from Burlington, Ontario, Canada is the Director of Business Development for Coyote Software. Coyote is an organization specializing in the customization and development of applications designed and developed for community health and social service organizations. Andrew overseas the entire project and is responsible to ensure that it aligns to the specific needs of the Ministry of the Attorney General and adheres to the standards and mandates found in the global SVN community. Andrew continues to reviews changes in community health and social service global mandates, and the changing advancements in technology and security to ensure that the products continue to evolve and align to the evolving needs of the broader global community.

Connecting Research & Practice in Supervised Visitation and Exchange

For supervised visitation and exchange providers, it is often difficult to stay consistently up to date with evolving developments in research that may inform the work that we do. In addition, much of the research in the area of supervised visitation and exchange is scattered in government reports, peer-reviewed journals, and conference posters, which may not always be easily accessible outside of academia. In order to provide evidenced-informed services that are the most beneficial to children and families, it is important to cultivate an awareness of the literature and to build an understanding of how research findings can be applied to practice in innovative ways. This session will present an environmental scan of the contemporary research published in the supervised visitation field and will highlight recent studies conducted with the Supervised Access Program in Ontario, Canada.

Maribeth Christensen holds an Honours Bachelor of Social Work from Ryerson University, a Masters of Social Work from the University of Toronto (with a specialization in Social Justice and Diversity), and a Masters of Arts in Political Science (with a collaborative program in Women and Gender Studies) from the University of Toronto. Maribeth began her journey with the Ministry of the Attorney General's (MAG) Supervised Access Program (SAP) in 2008 as a placement student and returned to take on the role of Program Analyst in March 2011. In late 2016, Maribeth began acting in the role of Program Manager for SAP, and is now responsible for overseeing funding contracts with non-profit organizations that provide supervised access services on MA's behalf, as well as working with them to develop standards and training.

Michael A. Saini, PhD, is an Associate Professor at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto and holds the endowed Factor-Inwentash Chair of Law and Social Work. He is the Co-Director of the Combined J.D. and M.S.W. program with the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto and the Course Director of the 40-hour Foundations to Custody Evaluations with the Continuing Education Program at the University of Toronto. For the past 16 years, he has been conducting custody evaluations and assisting children's counsel for the Office of the Children's Lawyer, Ministry of the Attorney General in Ontario. He has over 50 publications in the area of high conflict, alienation, supervised visitation, virtual visitation and parent competencies post separation and divorce, He is an editorial board member for the Family Court Review and a Board Member of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts.

Judy Newman MSW, RSW from Toronto, Ontario Canada recently retired from her position as Manager of the Supervised Access Program, Ministry of the Attorney General. Judy oversaw the funding contracts with the non-profit organizations hosting the supervised access services funded by the Ministry and worked with them to develop practice standards, policies and procedures and training. Judy was actively involved in the development of supervised access services before taking on her position in the government program. Judy is a registered professional social worker who previously worked at the Office of the Childrens Lawyer working with children and families involved in high conflict custody and access disputes conducting investigations and assisting childrens counsel to represent the interests of children before the court. Judy is President of the Alumni Association for the Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, organizing outreach and fundraising activities. As a consultant she continues to conduct research and be an active member of local and international non-profit organizations including the AFCC, AFCC-Ontario, SVN (Supervised Visitation Network) and the Toronto High Conflict Forum.

Child Sexual Abuse Referrals: The Latest Research

Be sure that your polices and practice are based on the latest research. The last time the Clearinghouse on Supervised Visitation published a training manual on child sexual abuse referrals was 2007. Since that time, a great deal of scholarly research as been published on child sexual abuse issues. Send a staff member to this session to learn about gender differences in child sexual abuse; about poly victimization; about characteristics of victims and perpetrators; about human trafficking of children in the U.S.; about red flags; and about handling these cases at visits. Even if you believe that your program does not accept child sexual abuse cases, you will learn new skills to keep children safe.

Karen Oehme is the Director of the Institute for Family Violence Studies and a Distinguished University Scholar at Florida State University. The Clearinghouse on Supervised Visitation is housed at the Institute and provides technical assistance and training to all of Florida's SV programs. Oehme's areas of research include intimate partner violence, child welfare, trauma, co-parenting, and law enforcement issues. She has published widely in scholarly journals to add to the knowledge base on issues that affect children and families.

An Attachment -focused Approach to Supervised Visitation with Young Children

The Nurturing Early Connection Program at Community Care Alliance is an intensive, relationship based, developmentally driven visitation program which provides increased (4-6 or more) hours per week of visitation for young children in foster care (0-2yrs) and their families, in an effort to improve engagement in services necessary for re-unification, increase the parental-child bond, and ultimately decrease time to permanency. This session will describe the program, its focus on child development, well-being, and attachment, and explore successes and challenges of program development as it relates to positive outcomes to date.

After receiving a Bachelor in Social Work from the State University of New York at Albany, Ivy Medeiros went on to receive her Master in Social Work from New York University in 1997. Her post-masters career has centered around the fields of child welfare and infant mental health. Mrs. Medeiros's passion for working with parents and young children led her to a post-Master's certificate in Infant Mental Health. Mrs. Medeiros currently serves as the Child Welfare Director at Community Care Alliance in Woonsocket, RI and serves as an adjunct instructor at Rhode Island College. Throughout the past 20 years, Mrs. Medeiros has gained extensive experience working with high risk families towards well-being, permanency and self-sufficiency.

Jeanne Rheaume graduated from RI College School of Social Work and received her MSW in 1996. She has been in the field working with children and families for over 30 years including Head Start, Early Intervention, and Family Home Visiting Programs. She is presently the Program Coordinator for the Immediate Visitation Response /Nurturing Early Connections Program at Community Care Alliance in Woonsocket RI and a member of the Board of Directors for the Rhode Island Association for Infant Mental Health

Hostile & Noncompliant or Traumatized?

Families required to have supervised visitation (sv) have been traumatized and as a result display behavior that can be challenging for SV staff. Staff experience families as hostile and non-compliant, resulting in staff frustration. This workshop will examine these family behaviors through the trauma lens and address how staff needs to work with these families. Participants will become able to identify and assess for trauma in family's behavior, learn how to do trauma responsive service and apply trauma responsive practice to sample cases

Jeff Bormaster is a California Licensed Clinical Social Worker with over 40 years of professional experience in human services and education. He provides consulting and training to public and private, non-profit and for-profits on organizational improvement, strategic planning and maximizing organizational success. He also works with direct service staff in out-of-home care, helping them improve services, incorporate best practices and increase outcome achievement. He publishes a monthly newsletter for organizational leaders called Leading Outside the Box. He was the Senior Director for Special Projects and Training at CWLA for over a decade and has taught at the university level and published several books for helping professionals, his newest book, Supervision for Success, was published in April, 2016.

Why Can't We Hire & Retain the Staff We Need?

As our direct service staff gets younger the challenge of both hiring and retaining them increases. The majority of our direct service staff are now in their twenties, Generation Y. They present as harder to hire and even harder to retain. This workshop will present the employment needs of this generation and what they require to remain employees.

Jeff Bormaster is a California Licensed Clinical Social Worker with over 40 years of professional experience in human services and education. He provides consulting and training to public and private, non-profit and for-profits on organizational improvement, strategic planning and maximizing organizational success. He also works with direct service staff in out-of-home care, helping them improve services, incorporate best practices and increase outcome achievement. He publishes a monthly newsletter for organizational leaders called Leading Outside the Box. He was the Senior Director for Special Projects and Training at CWLA for over a decade and has taught at the university level and published several books for helping professionals, his newest book, Supervision for Success, was published in April, 2016.

"Use the Force, Luke" Managing Number One, First & Staying Motivated to Do the Job

Working with at-risk kids and their family members can evoke difficult feelings that can compromise a professional's performance. This uplifting presentation offers strategies for self-management that keeps enthusiasm alive. Topics include: How to respond instead of react when self-esteem is injured; the importance of checking personal baggage at the door; how lack of support can negatively influence performance and how to compensate; and an uplifting definition of "success" that sustains motivation.

Youth care specialist Charlie Appelstein, M.S.W., President of Appelstein Training Resources, LLC (ATR) provides expert strength-based training, consultation, publications, CDs, and DVDs for individuals and groups who work with children and youth experiencing serious emotional and behavioral issues. Charlie Appelstein Described as "the best youth care trainer in America" by Robert Lieberman, former president of the American Association of Children's Residential Centers, Charlie has devoted his entire adult career to helping children and youth struggling with emotional and behavioral challenges and those who guide them. An engaging, informative, and humorous speaker, Charlie is the author of three critically acclaimed books on youth care and the creator of two innovative CDs that helps kids and parents make better choices and lead happier lives. Charlie's strength-based approach delivers a message of hope and possibility to our most vulnerable youth and those who shape and influence their lives.

Serving Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Serving individuals with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in a supervised visitation setting may require the provider to address the unique challenges of the client. ASD awareness has grown considerably thanks to major public health initiatives such as AutismSpeaks.org and AUCD.org to help teach the general public about this disability. Yet, SV providers need to be able to effectively take the general principles of ASD and be able to support their clients within this unique setting. This session will provide an overview of ASD diagnoses and characteristics in a detailed way that SV providers will learn how to adapt their current service model delivery to support those individuals with ASD. From learning the difference in accommodations vs. modifications in your SV guidelines, to understanding the visual vs. auditory components of ASD, attendees will leave with direct knowledge on the first steps they can take in supporting those with ASD.

Luke Comeau is the Executive Director of the Family Visitation Center in Sioux Falls, SD. Prior to joining the Family Visitation Center, Comeau worked as an Autism Specialist and Director of Training at the Sanford School of Medicine - Center for Disabilities in Sioux Falls. Luke has presented locally, regionally, and nationally on ASD, PBiS, FAS, and Computer Based Interventions. Luke holds a bachelor's degree in history, general science, and secondary education from Morningside College in Sioux City and a master's degree from Morningside College in severe and profound disabilities with an emphasis in Autism.

To Visit or Not To Visit: Addressing Child Reluctance and Refusal

There are many reasons to why a child may be reluctant and or refuse to visit. This could range from normative developmental reactions to trauma the child has experienced with the visiting parent(s). When understanding the reason for reluctance and refusal, visit supervisor can utilize various interventions to support the child's sense of safety and security to visit and also create space to attend to the parent-child bond. When there are ruptures in the parent-child relationship, the visit supervisor can take the role in creating the space for safe and secure communication to heal the relationship.

Jessica Hong is the Assistant Manager of Therapeutic Visitation Services for The New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. Jessica has been providing Therapeutic Supervised Visitation services at The NYSPCC since she was a MSW Intern and continues her work in assisting children and families heal from relational ruptures. Prior to returning to The NYSPCC, Jessica provided community and home based crisis and mental health services to children and adults with developmental disabilities and/ or with psychiatric diagnoses. Jessica's practice comprises of various trauma-informed and attachment-based modalities including TF-CBT, DBT, ARC model, and Theraplay. Jessica earned her undergraduate degree in Child and Family Studies from Syracuse University and a Master's Degree in Social Work from Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College.

Amy Pumo, Director of Clinical Services, is providing oversight for all of The NYSPCC's clinical programs. Prior to joining The NYSPCC, Amy served for over 13 years as the founding Program Director for the Bronx Child and Adolescent Witness Support Program, a project of the Center for Court Innovation. The program, located in the Bronx District Attorney's Office, provides trauma-focused support services to youth exposed to violent crimes. Amy has 20 years of experience providing social services to vulnerable populations and 16 years of experience supervising staff and social work students. She received her B.A. in Psychology from Villanova University and her Master of Science in Social Work, from Columbia University.

Staying Unbiased and Neutral in a Subjective World

In this session, participants will learn about the importance of knowing their own personal bias and how they can stay objective when documenting visits and interacting with all parties involved. Recognizing your own person biases is the first step in making sure you are staying objective and neutral. Documentation is a vital component in supervised visitation, but it can quickly be used in a manner that you did not intend, simply by missing key components of being objective and unbiased. Participants will learn how to overcome the obstacles of staying objective and unbiased by reviewing case story examples in a group setting, hearing real life court room cases, and learning examples on key areas that someones attorney may question you on. By going through these examples and scenarios, participants will be able to learn how they can improve their interaction and documentation and asses how to transition this knowledge back into their own location for implementation.

Joleen Thompson is the Director of Services for the Family Visitation Center in Sioux Falls, SD. In her role as Director of Services, Ms. Thompson directly oversees the programmatic implementation of visitation and exchange services as well as facilitating employee hiring, training, and ongoing supervision. Prior to joining the Family Visitation Center, Thompson spent 20+ years working in the Early Childhood/Head Start field. Most recently she was the Early Childhood Director for Youth Enrichment Services in Sioux Falls. While in that role she supervised and managed two Early Childhood/Head Start centers and opened a third center and assisted with the startup of the Boys and Girls Club of the Sioux Empire. Joleen holds a bachelor's degree in Elementary Education.

Luke Comeau is the Executive Director of the Family Visitation Center in Sioux Falls, SD. Prior to joining the Family Visitation Center, Comeau worked as an Autism Specialist and Director of Training at the Sanford School of Medicine - Center for Disabilities in Sioux Falls. Luke has presented locally, regionally, and nationally on ASD, PBiS, FAS, and Computer Based Interventions. Luke holds a bachelor's degree in history, general science, and secondary education from Morningside College in Sioux City and a master's degree from Morningside College in severe and profound disabilities with an emphasis in Autism.

Meeting Challenges for Family Court Families: Complex Solutions for Complex Family Transitions

Hannah's House San Diego is a 30-year old private nonprofit organization dedicated to serving the parents and children caught up in the adversarial California Family Court system. The Hannah's House network of support is comprised of a family of 4 programs which offer multiple services along a continuum of care that provides wraparound services for these vulnerable families. This presentation will provide detailed information on the administrative and service delivery aspects of the 4 programs as well as comprehensive case studies. Critical elements include: the funnel screening and intake process; cultural considerations; trauma-informed care; and individualized community collaboration for each family.

Susan Griffin is the Chief Executive Officer of Hannah's House, a nonprofit family service center providing professional supervised visitation and safe exchange services. Ms Griffin is a licensed marriage and family therapist with over 35 years or experience working with families coping with difficult transitions. She is the senior clinician in the Transitions Family Program at Hannah's House, serving parents and children involved in family court matters and is a recognized expert in helping parents navigate the challenges of managing parenting of children living in 2 homes. Ms Griffin began working with co-parents and the issues related to screen time in 1992, and has assessed and treated process addictions since 1987.

Trauma & Disrupted Attachment in the Visit Room: Assessment and Intervention

Families are often referred for therapeutic supervised visitation due to histories of child abuse, neglect or domestic violence. These histories have a direct impact on parent-child attachment and influence the quality of parent- child interactions in the visit room. Visit supervisors will learn how to assess for histories of trauma and disrupted attachment, recognize symptoms in the visit room, and learn strategies aimed at healing relationship ruptures and increasing positive parent-child interactions during visits.

Amy Pumo, Director of Clinical Services, is providing oversight for all of The NYSPCC's clinical programs. Prior to joining The NYSPCC, Amy served for over 13 years as the founding Program Director for the Bronx Child and Adolescent Witness Support Program, a project of the Center for Court Innovation. The program, located in the Bronx District Attorney's Office, provides trauma-focused support services to youth exposed to violent crimes. Amy has 20 years of experience providing social services to vulnerable populations and 16 years of experience supervising staff and social work students. She received her B.A. in Psychology from Villanova University and her Master of Science in Social Work, from Columbia University.

Jessica Hong is the Assistant Manager of Therapeutic Visitation Services for The New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. Jessica has been providing Therapeutic Supervised Visitation services at The NYSPCC since she was a MSW Intern and continues her work in assisting children and families heal from relational ruptures. Prior to returning to The NYSPCC, Jessica provided community and home based crisis and mental health services to children and adults with developmental disabilities and/ or with psychiatric diagnoses. Jessica's practice comprises of various trauma-informed and attachment-based modalities including TF-CBT, DBT, ARC model, and Theraplay. Jessica earned her undergraduate degree in Child and Family Studies from Syracuse University and a Master's Degree in Social Work from Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College.

A Trauma Informed Approach to Supervised Access and Exchange Services along a Continuum

This workshop will provide participants with a brief overview of trauma and the impact is has on supervised access and exchange participants and providers, particularly as it relates to safety. The difference between therapeutic and supportive/facilitated services will also be discussed. Strategies and interventions that incorporate this understanding will be presented using case examples, demonstrations and small group activities.

Julie Carlin Kramer, LCSW-R, holds a Masters degree in Social Work from the State University of New York Buffalo and a Bachelors degree in Elementary Education from Buffalo State College. Ms. Kramer has worked with children and families as a teacher, social worker and mediator for 22 years. She has been with the Catholic Charities Therapeutic Supervised Visitation and Court Related Service Unit for 17 years and is currently the supervisor of the Catholic Charities Therapeutic Supervised Visitation Program. Ms. Kramer is trained in a variety of trauma treatment modalities, including Progressive Counting and EMDR. She has presented numerous training workshops on topics related to therapeutic supervised visitation, child welfare and mediation. Ms. Kramer also serves as a field educator for SUNY Buffalo.

Amy Hudy, LMSW, holds a Master in Social Work degree from the State University of New York Buffalo and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Wilkes University. Ms. Hudy has worked with children and families for 5 years and has been with Catholic Charities Therapeutic Supervised Visitation and Court Related Services Unit for 2 years. Ms. Hudy is trained in a variety of trauma treatment modalities, including Progressive Counting. Ms. Hudy also serves as a field educator for SUNY Buffalo.

Supervised Access in A Small Town: Rural Considerations When Providing Access Services In Small Communities

Providing access in smaller communities where access to services is limited and everyone seems to know or be related to everyone else, can prevent some challenging situations. Anticipating and preparing for potential situations is key to successfully managing Supervised Access in a rural setting. Rural programs may not always service the same volume of clients as urban settings, but the challenges supervised access families can sometimes present are universal. We hope that by discussing and sharing ideas and options with others in similar communities, we will strengthen Supervised Access Services in all corners of the globe.

Louanne Piper The role of Program Coordinator of Supervised Access Visitation & Exchange Huron Perth has been and continues to to be a rewarding and challenging one for me since I began with the program more than 16 years ago. It was exciting to bring the program to our rural counties. I have been a member of the SVN International and Ontario Chapter for almost as long and enjoyed many years as an executive member. One of the highlights during that time was Co Chairing when we hosted the Niagara Falls ON conference.

Lisa Wilde has been the executive director at The Emily Murphy Centre and Supervised Access programs of Huron and Perth for over 12 years. I have been working to end Violence against Women, in some form or another, for almost my entire career; over 25 years. I have taught at the college level, delivered countless workshops and trainings and am currently working on a program to train police in this area on violence and trauma informed care. The challenges that rural life presents to women and their children is of particular interest to me.

Serving People with Disabilities in Supervised Visitation Center

Supervised Visitation Centers serve not only the entire family, but serve the whole person. This requires that centers meet the needs of their family members with disabilities, including physical, developmental, intellectual and cognitive disabilities. This workshop will review with service providers how to meet the families, needs when accommodations are needed in order to serve the whole person in the most effective and meaningful way.

Jannette Brickman has been involved in domestic violence policy, reform, or direct service since 1992. She joined Vera in October 2010 as a Senior Program Associate for the Supervised Visitation Initiative, which provides training and technical assistance for the national Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Grant Program, now the Justice for Families grant program. She also works on the Disability Grant Program, and has spent the past year and a half leading a collaboration around creating a curriculum for language access training for service providers of victims of crime. Ms. Brickman has worked with dozens of communities around the country assisting them in their development and implementation of supervised visitation centers. Ms. Brickman received her JD from DePaul University College of Law, her MA in Counseling from John Carroll University, and her BS in Journalism from Boston University.

Stalking 2.0: When the Digital Age Intersects with Family Court Cases

Intimate partner stalking has been linked to an increased risk of female homicide. One study found that 85% of female homicide victims experienced at least one episode of stalking within the 12 months prior to the murder. Among the most frequent types of intimate stalking behaviors are behaviors involving technology: following or spying on a victim, keeping a victim under surveillance, making unwanted phone calls and sending unwanted texts. Supervised visitation centers who work with intimate partner violence and stalking cases need to be familiar with the various forms of technology that are used to harm victims in order to make critical decisions regarding the safety and wellbeing of children. This session will focus on the various forms of technology that are misused by offenders and the considerations that technology presents to supervised visitation centers.

Jennifer Landhuis has been an advocate and educator on the issues of stalking, domestic violence, and sexual assault for 20 years. Jennifer is the Director of the National Stalking Resource Center, a project of Aequitas, where she provides national training and technical assistance to enhance the ability of professionals, organizations, and systems to effectively respond to stalking. Jennifer is also a consultant for the Office on Victims of Crime Training and Technical Assistance Center and a Federal Law Enforcement Center Domestic Violence Instructor. Jennifer has her Masters of Science degree in Criminal Justice from University of Cincinnati and is an adjunct professor at Boise State.

When Victims of Domestic Violence are the Visiting Parent

This workshop will provide an overview of non-custodial parents, who are victims of domestic violence and using supervised visitation and safe exchange services. It will discuss how to prepare these non-custodial parents and children for visits and how to prepare staff to work with this population. It will also provide practice pointers for working with this population, including safety planning with these parents and children.

Michele Robinson is a Senior Program Manager with the Family Violence and Domestic Relations Department of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ). Michele works with the OVC Vision 21: Linking Systems of Care for Children and Youth Project, the OVW Justice for Families: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Grant Program, as well as other projects. Ms. Robinson provides training and technical assistance to individuals, professionals, and OVW grantees throughout the country on issues of domestic violence, child custody and child protection, and supervised visitation and safe exchange. Ms. Robinson is a community volunteer for a local domestic violence organization and annually organizes a community awareness event for domestic violence awareness month.

Expanding Services with Satellite Centers

Expanding the reach of services is sometimes best accomplished with smaller Satellite Centers. Growing a central service center is not always feasible, client friendly or fiscally prudent. As service providers find themselves at or over capacity, it is worth taking the time to weigh the benefits of creating Satellite Centers to help fill the service needs. In this session we will look at the reasons Satellite Centers might be the best answer to service provider's expansion of service capacity. We will examine how to make your Visitation Center services portable and why it is important to retain consistency in service provisions while retaining the flexibility to meet differing community and geographical needs. We will look at some of the possible pitfalls of multiple sites and how to avoid them. There will also be creative examples of how Centers around the country have accomplished the extension of services with Satellite Centers.

Sharon Rogers is the Executive Director and founder of Safe Connections, formerly, the Judge Ben Gordon, Jr. Family Visitation Center. Twenty years ago, Sharon shared the dream and vision of a group of concerned professionals that went on to develop Family Visitation Center. This volunteer committee for an unfunded grassroots project went on to develop a board of directors, policies and procedures, safety protocols, site origination and design, training materials, community alliances, education and outreach. These humble beginnings have grown to include three locations to accommodate the needs of children and families in Northwest Florida for safe and nurturing space to spend time with their parents. Sharon is now a recognized expert in the field of supervised visitation, child abuse, family violence and parenting. Sharon attended the University of West Florida where she earned a Bachelor's Degree in Legal Administration.

Post Conference Symposium: Two New Visitation Projects

North Carolina: Enhancing Intakes through "Pre teaching"

Saturday June 2, 2017
9:00 AM- 10:30 AM

Family visits can be fraught with uncertainty, conflict, and a host of emotions. Despite their challenges, we know that visits are one of the most powerful tools we have for repairing family relationships and achieving reunification and/or permanency. To achieve these outcomes, we must find ways to "make the most" out of visitation. In this session, you will learn a structured process that will help you enhance the visitation process (preparation, facilitating connections, managing transitions, monitoring/feedback, adjusting the plan). You will also learn the concept of pre-teaching. Pre-teaching helps parents anticipate challenges they may face throughout the visitation process, explores their natural responses to these challenges, and pushes them to develop more appropriate actions. Combined, these frameworks set the stage for improved parenting skills, increased protective capacities, and positive outcomes for the family.

This workshop will explore the concept of Pre-teaching and how it can improve outcomes for children and families. Pre-teaching is a structured process of identifying the challenging issues that arise in visitation, and parterning with families to develop plans to overcome these obsticles. Presenters Rodney Little and Tonia Deese with UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work will walk attendees through the steps of pre-teaching. We will discuss how successful visitation requires a planned process from the beginning. The discussion will provide a framework for how to have difficult conversations with families, plan activities that achieve desired outcomes, and provide constructive feedback that helps families see that they are an active part of making plans that work.

Rodney D. Little, MHDL, is a Clinical Assistant Professor at UNC-Chapel Hills School of Social work. He has worked in the field of social work and child welfare for 27 years. Having served as a frontline social worker, manager, and faculty/curriculum developer, he has seen the issues of social work from many perspectives. Having particular interest in the areas of grief, parent child visitation, child sexual abuse, and substance use, he combines his experience with best practice, and research to produce workshops that are conversational, yet providing a strong framework in best practice.

Tonia Jacobs Deese, LCSW is a Clinical Assistant Professor at UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work. She has been in the child welfare and mental health fields for the past 12 years, working on the front line of DSS and providing outpatient therapy and Intensive In-Home services to children, adults and families. Tonia specializes in facilitating competency-based classroom and online trainings for child welfare staff, curriculum development, and contributing to practice-focused publications. She is especially interested in the Indian Child Welfare Act, family systems theory, primary and secondary trauma, and the impact of culture on family outcomes.

New Jersey: ReConnections: Assessment and Collaboration to Create the Optimal Visitation Plan

Saturday June 2, 2017
10:30 AM- 12:00 NOON

New Jersey's Department of Children and Families has partnered with a non-profit agency, FamilyConnections, Inc. to create and implement a new visitation model for the State. The program, ReConnections, provides a continuum of visitation services that includes a collaborative intake and assessment, planning meetings, and therapeutic and supportive supervised visits. The model utilizes Rose Wentz's Visitation Matrix, and trauma informed care utilizing the Attachment, Self-Regulation and Competency framework. This model relies on the collaboration of everyone involved in a visit, including the referral source, the family, informal and formal supports, and the provider agency. The workshop will include both the components of the model, with how implementation science has been used to identify, create, and evaluate the model.

Kelly Sachter, LCSW, is a Director of Programs at Family Connections, Inc, which provides services for families and children in NJ. Addressing trauma is at the core of all of Family Connections programs, including the various visitation programs, such as ReConnections. Kelly Sachter has provided presentations and trainings for various agencies and organizations with the topics of child welfare, visitation, supportive housing, and trauma at national organizations such as the Child Welfare League of America and Supervised Visitation Network. Kelly Sachter is dedicated to partnering with the stakeholders in the child welfare system to ensure that families can heal and repair from the trauma that has occurred in their lives.